Can anxiety lead to depression?

Although it's common for people to suffer from mixed anxiety and depression, and both problems have negative thinking at their root, there are key differences between the two. When we are anxious, our thinking will be overwhelming threat-related – we worry about danger of some kind, or bad things happening to us or those we love. When we are depressed, our thinking commonly focuses on themes of loss, regrets about the past, being stuck or trapped, or feeling hopeless about the future. So in cognitive therapy we treat depression and anxiety in different ways, based on different theoretical models and using slightly different techniques.

But something I often see is that people with an anxiety 'disorder', such as health or social anxiety, over time become depressed as well. Although this can be doubly frustrating and upsetting for the person, who now has depression to deal with on top of their anxiety problem, if you think about the effect that chronic anxiety problems have on us, it's not surprising. Let's take health anxiety as an example: when someone's worry and anxiety focus on their health, they will be hypersensitive to any physical symptoms, however minor, such as headaches or variations in their heartbeat. For the health-anxious person these – usually benign – symptoms mean they have a brain tumour or life-threatening heart condition.

Anxiety can be exhausting

Clearly, this is extremely worrying and upsetting for them, as they may spend most of their waking hours feeling highly anxious about getting a serious illness. Over time, this will wear them down – they may be sleeping badly, so will become physically and mentally drained and exhausted; they might feel emotionally wrung out from all the worrying; they may also feel stuck and hopeless about getting anyone to believe them, because doctors keep telling them there is nothing wrong, even though they are 100% sure there is. Put all this together and, over time, this poor health-anxious person may also become depressed.

In my experience though, if you help them overcome their health anxiety, the depression naturally lifts too. So it's very important that they get the right kind of help and support – if not, they might stay anxious and low for many years. I strongly believe that no-one should suffer from anxiety or depression in silence, because both problems are treatable with cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT). So please do get some help from me or another cognitive therapist soon.

If you would like to book a session call me on 07766 704210 or email dan@danroberts.com

Best wishes,

Dan