How to deal with suicidal thoughts

If you are having suicidal thoughts, you are not alone. Sadly, thinking about harming yourself is extremely common. And tragically, many people in the UK and around the world take that one step further and either attempt to hurt themselves or succeed in taking their life. In the UK, suicide is the leading cause of death among men under 50 – more than heart disease, cancer or road accidents.

But it doesn't have to be this way. I have worked with hundreds of people who had thoughts of harming themselves – and helped them see that suicide is not the answer. It is devastating for those left behind. It might seem like the only solution, but it never is. And suicidal thoughts come and go, so if we can help people through the worst – often quite short – period of time, those thoughts and impulses will naturally recede.  

Helping with depression

One of the most important messages I give people is that thoughts of suicide are completely natural, especially when we are feeling depressed. That's because our thinking becomes very negative and it's hard to see anything good in life, or to believe that things will ever get better. Depression is also really tough to deal with day to day, so ending your life seems like a way to stop the pain. But we can now treat depression extremely effectively with CBT, so once your mood lifts you will no longer feel that way. 

It's heartbreaking for me every time I hear of someone taking their own life, because I always think, It didn't have to be that way. Someone could have helped them and they would still be here today.

Mental-health professionals know that some psychological problems bring greater risk than others. These include depression, alcohol abuse, anorexia, psychosis and schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and 'personality disorders' like Borderline Personality Disorder. So if you or someone you love is suffering from one of these problems, please do keep an eye on them. Reach out to them often and ask how they are. Also be straight and say, 'I'm worried about you, are you thinking of killing yourself?' Just asking that question could help save their life, because if the answer is yes you should contact their GP or one of the numbers below.

If you are reading this and thinking of hurting yourself, please don't. Tell someone, even if it seems like the hardest thing in the world. I promise you that help is available – and that, a year from now, you will look back and feel the deepest gratitude that you kept yourself safe and can still enjoy all of the wonderful things life has to offer.

Warm wishes,

Dan

If you are thinking of taking your own life, or know someone who might be, please call one of the numbers below:

The Samaritans – available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year on 116 123 or email jo@samaritans.org

Childline – for children and young people under 19. Call 0800 1111 – the number won't show up on your phone bill

The Silver Line – for older people. Call 0800 4 70 80 90

SANE provides confidential support for people with mental-health problems, every day of the year from 4.30pm to 10.30pm on 0300 304 7000

Campaign Against Living Miserably (CALM) – for men. Call 0800 58 58 58 – 5pm to midnight every day

Papyrus – for people under 35. Call 0800 068 41 41 – Monday to Friday 10am to 10pm, weekends 2pm to 10pm, bank holidays 2pm to 5pm. Text 07786 209697 or email pat@papyrus-uk.org